A Note to Generation Comparison

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“There are the Kardashians living out another dramatic and lavish escapade on my TV, there goes another high profile blogger living her best holiday life through Instagram, there’s another curated selfie with studio lighting, perfected editing skills and maybe a lip filer or two…” It’s easy to see why there is an epidemic of comparison among my generation.

The act of comparison is a slippery slope, and one that even I have fallen down in the past. Not in a “I wish I had that life” kind of way but probably a, “I have that jacket, did it look as good on me?” kind of way. Luckily I am usually able to catch myself in that moment and ask why am I even bothered?

Why is up to social and mainstream media to set a certain level of ‘perfection’ we should fall under? Well guess what? It’s not.

When you think about it, social media is a weird and wonderful thing. I enjoy my time online and as I have wrote about before, I have found a balance that works for me, but social media is just a virtual place to hang out and shouldn’t affect your daily life because the majority of what we see is fabricated, it’s a constant highlight reel and you never know what one’s reality entails behind their glossy Instagram.

What ever goes on in your social media circle, doesn’t reflect who you are as a person. Sure, you can capture your wit in a tweet, post that selfie that makes you feel confident but what happens when you don’t get the amount of ‘likes’ you hoped for? What happens when your friends get more of a reaction than you? Does it make you feel as if you’re not good enough? If you answered yes to those questions then it’s time to take a step back and reevaluate your way of thinking.

If the metaphorical cloud were to disperse, the pixels ceased to create a bigger picture and the wi-fi permanently switched off, we would be none the wiser. Basically, we’ve become restrained to information (sometimes false, sometimes true) and a few pictures when there truly is no need.

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We are told that comparison is the thief of joy, and for good reason.

In an age where the world is set on selling you a product or image you need to have or be, the bravest thing you can do is be yourself. Enjoy your social media use for the entertainment it was meant to be but carve your own path with individuality and pride.

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5 thoughts on “A Note to Generation Comparison

    1. Thank you, Kellie! ❤️ I felt like it needed to be said. It’s so easy to fall down that spiral, and although social media can be fun, it’s not reality. It’s curated, a creative space to create, so it’s time we address the problem and let others know of the damage comparing yourself to what you see online can do to our daily lives if we choose to let it.

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  1. I LOVED this post! You’re such a talented writer and put into words exactly how I feel about social media. I have such a love-hate relationship with it! I love that you said you compare yourself not in a, “I wish I had that life” kind of way but probably a, “I have that jacket, did it look as good on me?” kind of way. I think that’s a great point to make because we all compare ourselves in different ways. I remember being told constantly that magazines made us all feel like trash because the girls on them look so perfect, but I never compared myself to those women because they were photoshopped. I’ve always compared myself to the girls who are REAL and who STILL seem perfect. The ones who were in my classes at school or who do live stories on Instagram and always look perfect. We all compare in different ways and feel “less than” for different reasons. But the important thing to remember is that no matter how we compare or why we compare, we need to stop ourselves as soon as we notice ourselves doing it, like you said you do. This was such a powerful post. Thank you so much for writing it! Sorry this is long, haha!

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    1. Thank you for saying that Coral, it means so much ❤️ We absolutely compare ourselves in different ways, and it is hard to ignore when we were constantly being shown pictures of what we ‘should’ be, or even being told what we should and shouldn’t do for years! It was obvious that it would just roll over to social media too, but as you said, the important thing is that we can stop it and re-train the way we think so that we stop comparing as soon as we notice. X

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